George Bernard Shaw said: "No man ever believes that the Bible means what it says; he is always convinced that it says what he means." With this in mind let's look at some of the Bible's prophecies. There is not one prophecy in the Bible that can be confirmed to have been fulfilled. To make up for this, Bible preachers and teachers go to great lengths to show how many of the prophecies are meant for future fulfillment. And they will interpret the Bible to mean whatever they can dream up to say it means. A great many preachers claim that particular prophecies in the Bible can have multiple fulfillments. Take the example of Ezekiel's prophecy of the return of the Jews to Palestine (Ezekiel 37, beginning at verse 15 to chapter's end). Ezekiel lived, according to commentators around 593 BCE. So-called prophecy experts claim this prophecy was fulfilled in 1948 CE. What they neglect to tell people, however, is that the event prophesied could be said to have been fulfilled some 60 years later around 538 BCE, when King Cyrus of Medo-Persia issued a proclamation that the Jews could return to their land. Preachers and prophecy "experts" claim that it had a double fulfillment, the second in 1948 CE. But as I quoted Shaw: "No man ever believes that the Bible means what it says; he is always convinced that it says what he means." They took what happened in 1948 as a sign of the end times, not realizing, that, according to Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Theory near infinitely improbable events occur on occasion. Quantum Mechanics and Theory always successfully predicts what actually happens in the quantum world. So the seemed-to-be prophecy, because of anthropic coincidence, seemed to have been fulfilled twice. Furthermore,Ezekiel even admitted to getting one of his prophecies wrong. Ezekiel prophesied the total and complete razing of Tyre, til nothing was left but a bare rock, by the armies of Babylon under Nebuchadnezzar (Ezekiel 26:7-14). But later, in Ezekiel 29:17-20, Ezekiel admitted that Nebuchadnezzar could not accomplish what Ezekiel had prophesied. According to the Bible, if a so-called prophet makes just one false prediction, he is a false prophet, and is supposed to be executed. The book of Ezekiel, is a book of "prophecy", but it contains at least one false prophecy, and that throws the whole book in doubt, and therefore, it puts the Bible, in which Ezekiel is found, in doubt also.

Feel free to add your own thoughts.

Tags: Bible, False, Prophecy

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Of course the Bible full of false prophecies. How can a prophecy not be false. These ancient people didn't have supernatural powers.

The concept of a prophet is absurd.

Theology is a load of crap.

Instead of obeying some priest or pastor, one can get the same results consulting a "psychic."  Both are confidence men.

I always wanted to ask Dionne Warwick how she wasn't able to predict that the "Psychic Friends Network" would go bankrupt in 1998.

By the same token, Anthony, it has now been shown to some folks' satisfaction that the whole notion of a Second Coming in general, and the Rapture in particular, is stupid: John of Patmos wrote in a cryptic language known as esopsephia, which was a manipulation of Greek in such a way that letter-number combinations and correspondences meant one thing to the Romans, who might confiscate an epistle, and another thing to the far-flung Christian missionaries of the time.  (It complicated matters enough that the Bible was written in Koine, which had no punctuation, such that "God is now here" could just as easily been "God is nowhere.")  Robert Graves, the poet, in his fascinating work on poetry and nature symbolism (in particular, trees) suggested in a footnote that the Greek number count for To Mega Therion (The Great Beast) was the same for Nero Caesar.  John was thus warning other Christians not of some event to happen sometime in the future, but of a current threat: Rome.  The Priesthood is thus selling a lie.

I thought the coded writing of John was called the apocrypha.  Regardless, what was simply communication with the 7 churches,  has been twisted into some incredible bullshit thinking.  

> By the same token, Anthony, it has now been shown to some folks' satisfaction that the whole notion of a Second Coming in general, and the Rapture in particular, is stupid

Well the Rapture, sure, but the notion of a second coming isn't just held by John of Patmos. Many of the gospels reference the Apocalyps and the coming of the Kingdom of Heaven. And some of the images they paint are every bit as crazy as the Left for Dead series portray.

Prophets never say when their prophesies will come true. They all seem to leave it to speculation.

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