A Dean and Professor of Law from Jerry Fallwell's Liberty University testified before a House Committee that prohibiting gay conversion therapy is a violation of religious freedom.

http://judiciary.house.gov/_cache/files/083e4fbb-7b87-40ad-a717-cd8...

California has outlawed this therapy because it has been shown to be harmful. The therapy has been condemned by many professional associations, but apparent the good dean thinks that religious freedom trumps science.

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The Christian therapist believes that "with God all things are possible" and believes God is a participant in the process. This does not furnish him with a realistic perspective and he may deceive both himself and the patient.

I guess it boils down to whether the patients in this therapy are satisfied with the results, and whether the therapist is giving them a realistic idea of the likelihood they will be satisfied.

  I'm not convinced by stories of a "converted" patient being seen in a gay bar.  Even in their terms, maybe that is just a slip-up and they are happier in a heterosexual marriage than they would have been without the therapy.

I thought the California law prohibited such therapy, rather than just trying to prevent false advertising.   

A 2002 study of 202 men and women who had undergone conversion therapy showed that all but 26 felt they had failed to make the conversion. Of those 26, 12 described themselves as still struggling with same-sex desires. Some reported harmful effects of the therapy.

In 2001 Robert Spitzer published a study of 200 individuals arguing that homosexuals could be changed by therapy provided they were highly motivated. The article was based on self-reports. A decade later he retracted the article and apologized to the gay community.

  I'm not convinced by stories of a "converted" patient being seen in a gay bar.

John Paulk was not just any converted patient. He was a prominent member of the conversion movement and wrote a book with his wife about how love won out. They were the poster boy and girl for the movement. They are divorced now. It was not just a one time slip-up.

In short, there is no evidence conversion therapy works and lots of evidence that it does not.

In the case of gay conversion therapy we not only have the testimony of former patients that the therapy did not work, but an apology from the former head of Exodus International, Alan Chambers, for having deceived so many people.

http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2013/06/22/exclusive-gay-cure-advocate-a...

I think it's fair to say that the gay conversion therapy movement has collapsed.

By the way the California law only bans the therapy for minors, who might be forced into it by their parents.

By the way the California law only bans the therapy for minors

So the people protesting this ban, want to do with their children as they see fit.  I wouldn't want gay teenagers to be pushed into conversion therapy either - or even Christian therapy that promotes anti-gay values, even if it isn't explicitly trying to convert them.  A lot of gay teenagers are quite traumatized by their conflicts, even if no therapist is trying to make them straight. 

It is not responsible or ethical for a therapist to promise results that are unlikely or impossible, and that is what the California law is aimed at preventing.

Do you think faith healing in general should be prohibited?  I'm sure that would run into opposition in terms of freedom of religion.  The gay conversion therapy has an element of faith healing, from what you say. 

Do you think faith healing in general should be prohibited?  I'm sure that would run into opposition in terms of freedom of religion.  The gay conversion therapy has an element of faith healing, from what you say.

One of my close friends in high school was a Christian Scientist and his father was a practitioner in the faith. The father died of a degenerative muscular disease that was never diagnosed. The son died of the same disease 20 years later at age 44 leaving behind a widow and child in poverty. He was a graduate of Harvard Law School and lost his job due to incapacity. He had no health insurance and would not see a doctor.

Should faith healing be prohibited? Perhaps not, but people ought to be aware of all the harm it causes in failing to be effective and in keeping people away from therapies that could be effective.

The Professor has case of the "God Virus"

Yes, religious business owners have come under threat. It seems that if you are religious nobody wants you to own a business. Jebus wouldn't like that. He wanted everybody to set up Mom and Pop stores.

Obamacare is aweful coz of the morning after pill. No you don't. That's abortion. You spread your legs so you are gonna have this baby. It won't be like last time when somebody swallowed my son.

We can make gay people straight again. Just keep asking them about sexuality while you shock them with the shocker machine. Pretty soon you will get the answer that you are looking for, or they can die trying.

See! There is hope for America. God never changes, but even that statement depends on the times you live in.

Over the years I've read and hear numerous reports of the abuses done in the name of this so called therapy.  It is offensive that people think it is needed or desirable, or that there is something wrong that needs to be fixed, in a gay person.  That is a form of bigotry.  I imagine if we had some sort of abusive therapy to change race or sex, so that a person could fit into an oppressive society, some people would take that on as an out from overt oppression.  Same here.

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