My Favorite Meal!

Surreal, not just found in art.

Tags: surreal

Views: 1281

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Oh that's so lovely Ruth! Thanks for the post!

Sk8ecat alerts us that this image isn't a photograph of the recent eclipse, but digital art from DeviantArt. See snopes solar eclispse from space-FALSE

I think the fact that it's a work of art makes it even more amazing.  Looks like something that Rick Sternbach or Adolf Schaller could have done for "Cosmos."

Those were all great!

OMS Ruth, I LOVE the tree eating the fence and the volcanic lightning!  I gotta figure out how to send these to some people I know woould love them (not very computer literate!) ~ Melinda  Wait, I think I posted it to FB. :)

LOL Melinda, I love those trees too, reminds me of the Ents in LOTRo. March of the Ents for those wondrous Loremasters! If only they hadn't put in that infernal cash shop and turned themselves into Sony light....

Right click the pictures and save image to your pictures folder, or right click and 'send image' to email to a friend.

This steel ball falling into sand looks surreal to me.

Hmmmm. The final result looks like a "soft" lunar crater, doesn't it?

Computer Simulation.  (I wish it moved about half the speed this is set for.  Made me kinda dizzy. But it's wonderful!)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9za1CP9ImA&feature=player_embedded#! 

Simulation: A Disk Galaxy Forms
Explanation: How do galaxies like our Milky Way form? Since our universe moves too slowly to watch, faster-moving computer simulations are created to help find out. Green depicts (mostly) hydrogen gas in the above movie, while time is shown in billions of years since the Big Bang on the lower right. Pervasive dark matter is present but not shown. As the simulation begins, ambient gas falls into and accumulates in regions of relatively high gravity. Soon numerous proto-galaxies form, spin, and begin to merge. After about four billion years, a well-defined center materializes that dominates a region about 100,000 light-years across and starts looking like a modern disk galaxy. After a few billion more years, however, this early galaxy collides with another, all while streams of gas from other mergers rain down on this strange and fascinating cosmic dance. As the simulation reaches half the current age of the universe, a single larger disk develops. Even so, gas blobs -- some representing small satellite galaxies -- fall into and become absorbed by the rotating galaxy as the present epoch is reached and the movie ends. For our Milky Way Galaxy, however, big mergers may not be over -- recent evidence indicates that our large spiral disk Galaxy will collide and coalesce with the slightly larger Andromeda spiral disk galaxy in the next few billion years.

Fantastiac! I'll never think of galaxies quite the same way again. This is so dynamic and 3D. You could really see the center spinning faster than the periphery.

I have been fascinated with astronomy since I was about 4 or 5 years old (1943-45).  We lived right on the ocean, blackouts were still in effect, and my dad would take me outside at night and point out the constellations to me, and tell me the myths that went with them. 

I have never seen night skies like that since then.

Supercell over Kansas looks like stack of flapjacks.

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