As christmas day inevitably creeps around the globe I extend to all rational people who have made the transition to realising there is no supernatural: "Reason's Greetings".

No matter how anyone spends the day, I'd like to encourage all members and followers of Atheist Nexus to spend a small amount of time to consider the impact of religion upon the world. Just reflect on the discrimination, hatred, wars, deaths etc which can be directly linked to irrational faith. Include other systems which have had a negative impact like patriotism, racism, sexism and so forth you could be very occupied.

From this I hope some of you may resolve to take some action towards, if not ending, at least impeding the influence of religions on all communities. The action could range from making a donation to a secular organisation or cause for the preservation of nature, protecting or supporting other people or any secular movement. If not monetary assistance, then active participation to change how humanity acts towards each other or the natural world can be goal. Anything from letter writing to working with an organisation will make a difference.

If atheism really wishes to have a day on which to celebrate then 25 December is ready made. It's a holiday in many (most?) countries, it's celebrated everywhere and the xians stole it from pagans originally. Why can't it be appropriated by the unfaithful?

Reason's Greetings and a happy Cosmos Day!!!

Tags: death, discrimination, rational, reason, war

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:>) You like?

That's lovely Goz.
I put up a Festivus pole at work yesterday.

BTW, Goz, your pole is not a true Festivus pole. The Festivus pole is made of an unadorned aluminum pole (as Frank Costanza finds tinsel distracting). :D
Reason's Greetings to you too, funk Q.

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