Poll: Voting habits of Atheists, Agnostics, and Free Thinkers


This poll is directed to any A|N member who lives in a democracy and has the right to vote. There is really no way to do polls here, so I will start this as a discussion thread.

Answer any or all of the questions you’d like, but please copy and paste the questions into your comment so that other members do not have to refer back to the top of the page to match your response to the question.

1. What age could you register to vote?

2. At what age did you register to vote?

3. How many years ago was that?

4. Did you come from a family that was involved in politics, or always took time to vote?

5. Do you vote in:
a. Every single election
b. 75% or more of all elections
c. About 50% of all elections
d. Less than 50% of all elections
e. Only for the really important offices

6. Do you consider yourself an informed voter?
a. Extremely informed
b. Moderately informed
c. Poorly informed

7. Does a candidate’s views on religion and atheism, or their personal religious beliefs, affect your choice?

8. Do you always vote along party lines?
a. Always
b. Almost always, but with rare exception
c. Seldom
d. Never. For the individual candidate only.

9. Are you a single-issue voter?

10. Would you like to share what issues are important to you?

11. Are their any issues to which you are absolutely indifferent?

12. What party of political ideology do you identify with?

13. Have you ever held a public office, or do you have any ambition to do so?

14. Where do you live?

Tags: conservatives, democracy, democrats, elections, left, liberals, progressive, republicans, right, voting

Views: 97

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

1. What age could you register to vote?

18

2. At what age did you register to vote?

18

3. How many years ago was that?

22

4. Did you come from a family that was involved in politics, or always took time to vote?

Immediate family, no. Paternal grandmother, aunt, and uncle, yes.

5. Do you vote in:

b. 75% or more of all elections

6. Do you consider yourself an informed voter?

b. Moderately informed

7. Does a candidate’s views on religion and atheism, or their personal religious beliefs, affect your choice?

Yes.

8. Do you always vote along party lines?

b. Almost always, but with rare exception

9. Are you a single-issue voter?

No.

10. Would you like to share what issues are important to you?

The environment, animal welfare, socio-economic justice, equality, and human rights.

11. Are their any issues to which you are absolutely indifferent?

None to which I am absolutely indifferent, but plenty I don't understand.

12. What party of political ideology do you identify with?

Democrats, progressives, liberals.

13. Have you ever held a public office, or do you have any ambition to do so?

Never held office, but sometimes think I might be good in office -- if only I were smarter about business and such.

14. Where do you live?

Dallas, TX, USA
Dallas, TX, USA

Back to postal codes?
Old school fiscal conservative Republican

Jeff, do you feel that the party is currently adhering to that old school fiscal policy? Why or why not?
1. What age could you register to vote?
18

2. At what age did you register to vote?
18

3. How many years ago was that?
6

4. Did you come from a family that was involved in politics, or always took time to vote?
They usually took the time to vote, but didn't seem to care too much about politics.

5. Do you vote in:
a. Every single election
b. 75% or more of all elections
c. About 50% of all elections
d. Less than 50% of all elections
e. Only for the really important offices
c. About 50% of all elections

6. Do you consider yourself an informed voter?
a. Extremely informed
b. Moderately informed
c. Poorly informed
b. Extremely informed (Usually if I don't vote, it's because I'm not as informed as I'd like to be)

7. Does a candidate’s views on religion and atheism, or their personal religious beliefs, affect your choice?
No, unless a big deal about their religion has been made.

8. Do you always vote along party lines?
a. Always
b. Almost always, but with rare exception
c. Seldom
d. Never. For the individual candidate only.
b. Almost always, but with rare exception.

9. Are you a single-issue voter?
No.

10. Would you like to share what issues are important to you?
Human rights (gay rights, women's rights), ending genocides, ending the spread of HIV/AIDs, etc., health care, foreign policy, improvements in education

11. Are their any issues to which you are absolutely indifferent?
No.

12. What party of political ideology do you identify with?
Democrat, liberals, progressives (sorry to parrot your response, Dallas :) )

13. Have you ever held a public office, or do you have any ambition to do so?
No.

14. Where do you live?
Northern New Jersey
1. What age could you register to vote? 18

2. At what age did you register to vote? 18

3. How many years ago was that? 8

4. Did you come from a family that was involved in politics, or always took time to vote? They always vote

5. Do you vote in:
b. 75% or more of all elections
The last time I forgot to vote thet banned smoking in bars. I don't miss it now that its gone, but I don't think we should be baby-sitting the 21+ crowd.


6. Do you consider yourself an informed voter?
b. Moderately informed
I always read up on the issue or candidate but occasionally wish I could change my vote.

7. Does a candidate’s views on religion and atheism, or their personal religious beliefs, affect your choice?
As long as they support the separation of church and state, and they don't make bigoted stements about non-believers I don't care what their personal views are.

8. Do you always vote along party lines?
b. Almost always, but with rare exception

I will not vote for a Republican. Third party candidates get preference over Democrats, but that comes down to the individual. Its worth noting that most of the positions in this last election were non-partisan

9. Are you a single-issue voter? no

10. Would you like to share what issues are important to you? protecting minorities, marriage equality, protecting women's reproductive rights, combating poverty/homelessness

11. Are their any issues to which you are absolutely indifferent? No, I'm too opinionated.

12. What party of political ideology do you identify with? I identify more as a socialist, but would be happy with a compromise that achieves the same goals: maximum personal freedom combined with the entire population having its basic needs met.

13. Have you ever held a public office, or do you have any ambition to do so? No, not really. I'm far too shy, and the stress would make me sick.

14. Where do you live? Seattle, Wa USA
Third party candidates get preference over Democrats

In Texas, a vote for a third party candidate seems to be a vote for a republican. In most counties, except Dallas and Austin, republicans usually win out over dems, but not always. And in races where the democrat lost by a slight margin, it is worth noting that if third-party votes had gone to the democrat, he would have won, but if they had gone to the republican, it would not have made any difference as he would have won anyhow.
I can understand why you'd feel that way. Texas is really conservative. I grew up in a conservative part of Washington State, and some of the things my husband tells me about growing up in West Texas surprises me.(No sex ed) I actually have trouble dealing with some of my in-laws because of it.

Dems almost always win here, and if a third party makes it onto the ballot its usually The Green Party. I really don't like the two party system, especially when both parties are really two different factions of a business party. Keep in mind that admitting you're "Pro-Life" or "Anti-Marriage Equality" is political suicide in my town. Its a little different in other counties, but I feel safe in mine.
I really don't like the two party system

The difficulty of not having a two-party system is that it is virtually impossible to get a majority.

In last Governor race in Texas, Rick Perry won with only about 37% of the vote, +/-, because there were two Independent choices, and one Dem. So he took the office when less than half of the people approved of him. That is a problem, IMO.
Thing is that both parties are different factions of a business party. Yes, we tend to do better when the Dems are running the show but look who they invited to the talks on healthcare. They're also just as quick to bow their heads piously as the Republicans. The main difference I see is that the Republicans blatantly don't give a shit about the population where as the Dems put at least some effort into it.
...but look who they invited to the talks on healthcare.

Who do you mean? The insurance industry?

They're also just as quick to bow their heads piously as the Republicans.

True.

The main difference...

IMO, I see big differences between the parties. While I am not so simple minded as to have a highly polarized "dem=good / rep=bad" mentality, the democrats tend to be more progressive, and it is progressives (regardless of place or time) that always lead us into the future. There have been, and are, conservative democrats and moderate republicans, but it is a progressive ideology that I embrace; so no matter when, where, or how it manifests itself, or what if calls itself, a progressive agenda is what I usually support.

Without a progressive agenda we would not have civil rights, the end of slavery, the female vote, gay liberation, desegregation, consumer protections, etc.

But getting back to the two parties: When I look at the Congressional Scorecards published each year by organizations such as the HSUS, the HRC, or the League of Conservation Voters, it is the democrats who consistently score high in these areas -- the issues that are important to me.

I'll grant that neither party is perfect, but I have no problems whatsoever in seeing major differences between the two.
Who do you mean? The insurance industry?
Yep. There wasn't a single person supporting Universal Healthcare there.

I understand what you are saying about progressives, and tend to agree. I just don't think that the Democrats are as liberal/progressive as I'd like to see. I tend to view them as more moderate. They're trying to play catch up, the healthcare issue should have been solved when Clinton was in office. Did you know that Obama decided to keep the faith based initiatives around?

I also don't see how the Democrats scoring high on a score card justifies limiting office to one of two groups. As it stands now a majority of these people are career politicians, that when push comes to shove, will choose the interests over whoever's paying for their next campaign over the best interests of their constituents. They know that with enough money and a D next to their name they'll probably get re-elected.

I'd like to see more of a variety, and a chance for other ideologies to present their solutions. I'd also like to see enough competition to scare the current groups into doing the right thing.
But should the insurance industry have been ignored or barred? I don't think so. I don't see how that could be done, even if some of them are a bunch of scoundrels.

I just don't think that the Democrats are as liberal/progressive as I'd like to see.

I can agree with that to some extent, but I think it is difficult to define what is or is not liberal or conservative, as that is highly subjective to the individual. I don't think we can say 'I want you to be more liberal.' We should say 'I want you to support this view on abortion, or equality, or taxation.'

Did you know that Obama decided to keep the faith based initiatives around?

Yes. I don't like it, but he is very diplomatic and inclusive. Maybe that is good, maybe not. Only time will tell, I guess.

...will choose the interests over whoever's paying for their next campaign over the best interests of their constituents.

True. Money corrupts the whole system, it seems.

RSS

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service