http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/22/bill-oreilly-war-on-easter...

as if we needed more proof that it's inherently Christian to have the need to feel persecuted.  this made me wonder why O'Reilly doesn't push for more celebration of Jewish holidays in public schools.  i never hear Jews complain about it - i guess they've accepted their persecution.  

i know that Easter is a big old Christian holiday, but let's face it - no one likes Easter.  ok, kids like their egg hunts and chocolate bunnies, but grown up believers don't dig on Easter.  personally, i think it's b/c the whole resurrection story is so hard for adults to swallow and they don't like to be confronted with superstitions that ordinarily they'd dismiss.  

anyway, i welcome the war on Easter.  it's bad enough that schools celebrate Xmas for a full month (it's a season after all), but Easter has no place in a public school.  it's the beginning of spring - celebrate that.  have your spring egg hunts - that makes a lot more sense than bunnies who bear live children passing out eggs for some unknown reason.  

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grown up believers don't dig on Easter.  personally, i think it's b/c the whole resurrection story is so hard for adults to swallow ...

If that were true, Easter wouldn't be such a big deal in America. The problem is that so many adults do swallow it, using reason and logic in every other part of their life, but somehow shut that side of their brains off when considering yet another resurrection myth. That's the real challenge: getting adults to think like adults in all areas of their lives, religion not excluded.

i don't know, i think your average everyday, church on easter and xmas xtians probably look on the resurrection story and shrug it off.  sure, the devout take it quite seriously.  but the biggest part of easter, much like xmas, is in the marketing directed towards the kiddies.  the egg dyes, the baskets, the peeps, the bunny costumes, etc.  i know secular families that go thru the easter motions for their kids.  it's great propoganda when non-believers gleefully expose their kids to another faith's holiday for purposes of inclusion, and wanting your kids to have fun like their peers.  

Oh yeah, I agree about the folks who only go to church twice per year. They might shrug it off, but I was more talking about the people who keep the doors of the church open by tithing, going every week, etc., and the people who keep the institution of "the church" open for business. Devout believers who go every Sunday number in the 100s of millions, if we include folks in South America, the U.S., Africa and elsewhere.

somehow shut that side of their brains off when considering yet another resurrection myth.

Except they likely don't know how common miracle stories are.  I've heard the stories about Jesus, but I've also heard that lots of gurus are surrounded by stories of miracles.  They get training in magic.  But the believers have only heard Jesus mentioned in a worshipful atmosphere.  It's part of the religion and our culture, not to consider him in other than a worshipful way.

I thought recently - maybe Jesus was a narcissistic cult leader.  Only he was murdered by the Romans before he decayed as Jim Jones did.  Being crucified made Jesus' reputation.

Jim Jones started out very idealistic, anti-racist, trying to create a contemporary utopian society, and he decayed into drug and sex addiction and ended up semi-murdering 900 people. 

But I also like the idea of Jesus being a genuine sage, who earned the loyal friends who finagled him out of death on the cross, and had a long life outside the Roman Empire.

The Romans were horrific, like Nazis in their cruelty.  If you don't like someone, nail them onto pieces of wood - they can't live that way, but they die as slowly as possible - it would be too merciful to kill them quickly.   Very horrible!

ODT, people who swallow the resurrection story don't use "reason and logic in every other part of their life".

Many, even the dirt-poor among them, vote Republican. With Repubs doing even more than Dems to serve the rich, voting Repub is like voting for the people who will rob them.

Bill Orally on Fox last year, during an interview with the American Atheists chief, remarked "The tide goes in; the tide comes out. There's a god." His remark was dumb, but like his "wars" on xian holidays it attracts gullible viewers. With more viewers, Fox can charge advertisers more and pay Bill more.

Getting adults to think like adults is a huge challenge; xianity rewards them for thinking like children. Little children.

The freedom we have won't attract them. It will frighten and maybe anger them.

Freedom requires people to be responsible, to fix what's not going well. Gullible folk don't fix; they blame.

I saw evidence for that while talking with voters when I ran for office. Gullible folk want leaders to tell them what to do.

 A still religious brother several years ago gave me more evidence when he blamed me for anger he was feeling. I took responsibility for what I'd said; he refused to accept responsibility for his reaction to it.

I understood. We grew up in the same authoritarian family and I too, when I was young, didn't know how anger differed from angry actions.

Many religious folk do not, and will not, think like adults.

Tom, I have long thought that those who know and own themselves, who are in the words of Maslow, "self-actualized," neither look to lead others around nor look for someone to lead them, BECAUSE They Possess Themselves And Their Actions.  The child-adults you refer to are scared shitless of responsibility, as you state, or they recognize the opportunity to manipulate others for their benefit, and become the Jerry Falwells and Pat Robertsons of our current day.

So big surprise, they want there to be a god ... a Big Daddy who can make it all better in the end rather than requiring that they take action to rectify things by themselves.

Loren, you're right about some xians recognizing the opportunity to manipulate others for their benefit, and becoming our Jerry Falwells and Pat Robertsons.

Years ago, soon after Falwell appeared in news stories, I was at an American Atheists meeting in SF and saw a book he had authored. It was about the personal characteristics of fundamentalists. Browsing a few pages, I thought it looked like a report of research he had done, perhaps for a degree. Perhaps cynically, I concluded "So that's what got him started."

At another time I saw these words; "He who carves the Buddha does not worship him."

I don't know whose thinking they summarize; I take them to mean that religious leaders are less religious than their followers.

Tom, May I post this comment on Facebook with attribution to you? 

Had to look up Hossenfeffer. No, I don't think so. I like German food; not rabbit.

haha.  i learned it from this episode of bugs bunny:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDe8fTgVUZw

ah, reminiscing.  good stuff.

Sentient, your imagination reveals a science fiction writer residing in your brain.

Joan, glad there's someone in there!  Just free-associating.  I have a strange sense of humor.

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