in light of the recent outbreak, i have so many thoughts on the subject.  

first, tornadoes are largely a north american phenomenon.  they happen in europe too, but rarely the massive types we have here.  if we are God's chosen country, He sure seems to hate us a bunch.  especially in the Bible Belt.  

second, what happens if tornadoes become much more prevalent?  will people who live in those areas move? kinda like the situation with coastal areas.  will those people move inland?  could that bring liberals and conservatives into direct contact?  could that even work?  sounds scary.  

third, if tornadeos do increase in frequency, will people more readily accept climate change? 

fourth, i have an acquaintance who believes that the government can create tornadoes.  he does't think this is a conspiracy theory.  

fifth, i fully expect Pat Robertson to claim that today's tornadoes which are about to hit Moore, OK again are revenge from God for that atheist woman who Wolf Blitzer interviewed after last week's storm.

sixth, storm chasers are badass.  

seventh, it makes sense for Republicans to be religious.  if God didn't hate poor people he wouldn't send tornadoes to wipe out their trailer parks.  

finally, i couldn't live in tornado country.  those fuckers scare the shit out of me.  good luck to the people of Oklahoma tonight, my thoughts are with them.  

Views: 452

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Matthew, I agree with you about firefighters. My daughter, husband, two daughters and their two partners all belong to a volunteer fire dept. in Pend Oreille County, in a forest with homes scattered here and there. They take fire and distress calls night and day, they are available every day of the year. I respect their commitment to community. 

I am not so sanguine about people who risk life and limb for thrills. When they get stuck on a cliff, or rescued from a mishap, or do things they are not skilled to do, and my family members risk their lives to rescue them, I am just plain outraged. My family would never refuse a call for help. But how about people using better judgment to prevent such risks. 
Living life the the fullest means something different to you than to me. 

I should have written, My daughter, her husband ....

Joan, when are you going to write the story of your life?  I so want to read it.  And, I imagine, your children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren.

In case you haven't noticed, I am writing my story. When a topic comes up that reminds me of one of my experiences, I write it up, tuck a copy in my book, "A Splendid Heresy", and it is available for my children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. That is my legacy. 

I have chosen a rather different way of experiencing life, and it started with basic curiosity. Now that I am not interested in traveling, or marching, or campaigning, I enjoy sitting in my nice soft chair, typing away at my computer and remembering. 

I hope you and others enjoy learning about me. I think I am an interesting person; maybe not to look at, but to learn about. 

Also, you might notice that my personal stories often have historical research connected to them. James Burke's "Connections" and David Attenborough's many documentaries have an important impact on my life and visions.

What is so interesting to me is the role my family and religious community played in restricting my thinking and acting.  Something happened to let lose an internal drive that amazes even me. When I retell my stories I think they are interesting. 

I have noticed Joan, and you are Very interesting!  I love to hear your stories, and learn from you.  I am so glad we met here on AN.

Climate Destabilization is thought to increase the strength and duration of tornadoes, not their frequency, although it's early days in data collection.

I suspect people will begin to invest in storm cellars, instead of abandoning the central third of the US. There's no equivalent quick safety valve for rising seas.

I saw one study in which officials of towns devastated by Climate Change driven wildfires, and people who'd lost everything, were just as much Climate Deniers a year later. They had been helped by their conservative Climate Denier communities and were grateful to them. Maybe after a town is burned to the ground three times in a decade people will begin to question. Who knows what it will take? At some point there will be a tipping point in public opinion, even in tornado alley. Conservative publications, radio and TV news coverage have a lot of influence. One study showed that people who personally had lower taxes from Obama's initiatives were staunchly convinced that he'd raised their taxes. Examining your own taxes is more work and less entertaifing than listening to an angry radio rant as you drive. Hard facts don't matter in the face of group bonding.

Powerfully stated. 

Heart breaking to hear about the 3 storm chasers that died. I suppose "believers" think god punished them for their pursuit of science.

Not really, Randall.  Way I hear it, someone in the community was masturbating ... and god wanted to make sure he got the guy.

I mean, you know the old saying about omelets and breaking eggs, right?  Right?!?

Here's something to ponder. Why do trailer parks peopled with professed believers seem to be a magnet for tornadoes? Example. A tornado struck a rural village in Wayne County, Illinois, a few years back (the county itself is very rural). Only thing left standing was the local cinder block "shot and a beer" tavern where Billy Bob Biker goes on Saturday night to pick up middle-aged Susie "Quick Release" Drawers for the evening. The church, on the other hand, got nailed. God sort of reminds me of Carlos Marmol - relief pitcher for the Chicago Cubs. When he's on his game, he's great, e.g. Sodom and Gomorrah. When he's off, he can blow a three run lead in the bottom of the 9th, e.g. Moore, OK, atheist survives while true believers and children are killed.

my mom believes the myth that tornadoes "skip" over churches.  this drives me crazy. 

Really? Send her this photo of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Ridgeway, Illinois, after last year's tornado went through.

Parishioner John Holmes looks at the destruction of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Ridgway, Ill., Feb. 29. Homes, churches and businesses were destroyed by multiple tornadoes in six states. At least 12 people were killed in the violent storms.

RSS

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service