It's impossible for capitalism to survive w/o religion(s)?

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In Marxist critique, the relationship between capitalism and the culture/underlying societal myth is known as the SUPERSTRUCTURE.  In other words, organized religion is part of that which sustains the social order and keeps people in their place because people derive meaning and identity and understand their place in their universe through religious language so it is impossible, say, for peasants in feudal time to imagine things being any other way IF THEY ARE UNDER THE HYPNOSIS OF THE SUPERSTRUCTURE and prevailing societal myth ... and likewise it's impossible for today's American wage slaves to imagine things being any other way or for women to emancipate themselves if they are under the hypnosis of the Bible's story in Genesis where Jehovah cursed man in early days to be a wage-slave and woman to be a slave of man forever by saying in Genesis 3:

16To the woman he said,

   “I will make your pains in childbearing very severe;    with painful labor you will give birth to children. Your desire will be for your husband,    and he will rule over you.”

17To Adam he said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’

   “Cursed is the ground because of you;    through painful toil you will eat food from it    all the days of your life. 18 It will produce thorns and thistles for you,    and you will eat the plants of the field. 19 By the sweat of your brow    you will eat your food until you return to the ground,    since from it you were taken;

...

A new mythos and superstructure would have to be invented. (There are secular superstructure cultural myths, such as the mythos of 'manifest destiny', or of 'progress'...)

Spanish classical philosopher Seneca echoed Marx when he said that religion was false to the wise, true to the ignorant and USEFUL to the powerful.

Capitalism will do just fine without religion, because the basis of capitalism is appeal to individual self-interest.  The greater danger is that the self-interest of the clever/powerful/lucky will so overwhelm the system that a new mythology will arise to indoctrinate the proles.  The result will be a slanted, perverted capitalism similar to feudalism - which perhaps is where modern America is headed.  In such a system, the extreme concentration of wealth in the hands of a few is lauded as morally preferable.

Capitalism is neutral regarding distribution of wealth.  It is neither necessary for wealth to become concentrated amongst the "capitalists" to the complete chagrin of labor, nor is it necessary that every worker receive a decent wage, lest competitive pressures drive wages and prices back into equilibrium.  Any one of a broad range of outcomes - some deeply appealing as fair, others execrably odious - are possible under capitalism. 

Doctrine and myth are excellent tools to convince people to willingly act against their own self-interest.  I would opine that if one doctrine - religion - somehow goes away, then it will be supplanted by another doctrine, such that the status quo is barely disturbed.  But even if this fails to happen, and somehow magically the proles would be able to exercise material choices in accordance with their self-interest, the result won't be the supplanting of capitalism by something better (or worse), but merely a slight tilting of capitalism into a tangential direction.

scccreeeeeeetch... what did this man just say?
http://freeinternetpress.com/story/Liquid-Democracy-Web-Platform-Ma...

He also used his podcast to introduce a family and gender policy concept. Haase wants marriage and registered life partnership to be legally equal and to eliminate the tax advantages in Germany that are bestowed exclusively on heterosexual marriages. He also wants the government to stop documenting the gender of its citizens.

Capitalism is a religion. Its god is called profit. It creates its own morality which we know as greed. It has its own fortune tellers which people call economists. It has its saints and sinners which people call rich and poor. It has its own mega-churches which people call corporations. Its followers will ignore science in the name of capitalism's god.

It is not an economic system. Its not a cultural system. Its a religion which even corrupts other religions in the name of its god.

Time to start treating it like what it is ... a religion.

Seriously Dee, that makes a lot of sense!  ~ Melinda

Yeah, scary isn't it. It even has its own mythical figures such as John Galt and the Self-Made Man.

The really scary part is that its based on a fictional version of reality which has no real bearing on actual reality. Property rights are a purely human concept which the universe does not recognize. In fact, the universe will remove those rights by destroying your property.

Capitalism also has a mythological enemy which they call Collectivism even though they rely on its existence to support their own. The group is their mortal enemy and they have a rabid response to the existence of that enemy unless they have need of it. They rely on the collective of the government to create and maintain the environment where they can flourish. The group is bad unless it provides some form of support such as the military to serve and protect their interest. They even have a form of capitalist formed socialism called insurance which everyone pays into and those who need it get a payout.

"The really scary part is that its based on a fictional version of reality which has no real bearing on actual reality. Property rights are a purely human concept which the universe does not recognize. In fact, the universe will remove those rights by destroying your property."

There's also the problem of selective failure-blindness in regards to how "successful" free-market capitalism is without any consideration of society and its "greater good". Instead they use the nebulous metric of wealth generation, without regards to the fact that most of the wealth referred to is a fictional construct.

"Capitalism also has a mythological enemy which they call Collectivism even though they rely on its existence to support their own."

Absolutely. The authoritarian/fascist capitalists and libertarian/anarcho-capitalists, both. 

"[Modern capitalism] is masterful at producing services people don't need and in large part probably don't want. It is brilliant at convincing people that they do need and want them. But it has difficulty turning itself to the production of those services which people really do need. Not only that, it often spends an enormous amount of time and effort convincing people that those services are either unrealistic, marginal or counterproductive."

~ John Ralston-Saul 

I think you're confusing the line between cultural myths and actual beliefs. Yes, the "Altar of Money" has been a popular mythology for both criticizing and glorifying the US finance sector as it has grown significantly in power during the process of globalization. This myth seems to stem from the noblesse oblige of aristocratic wealth, or at least the desire to obtain such status, but the reality tends to be more of a Robber Barons scenario.  

 

However, none of the involved parties actually hold such myths as honest beliefs. They're simply  theater meant to buy support and ward off opponents.

There are a lot of atheist Libertarians including myself. The Libertarian is also the fastest growing party in the U.S. and is only growing faster and faster. 

So I'm going to go ahead and say capitalism will do just fine. 

I will second that. In fact one could argue that it is only when religion loosed its grip on the European populations generally (to an extent) during the renaissance that capitalism emerged from what previously was feudalism. Capitalism (free trade) is inhibited by religion, in spite of what the religionists say.

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