How does Our Language Shape the Way We Think?
By Lera Boroditsky


Humans communicate with one another using a dazzling array of languages, each differing from the next in innumerable ways. Do the languages we speak shape the way we see the world, the way we think, and the way we live our lives? Do people who speak different languages think differently simply because they speak different languages? Does learning new languages change the way you think? Do polyglots think differently when speaking different languages?


These questions touch on nearly all of the major controversies in the study of mind. They have engaged scores of philosophers, anthropologists, linguists, and psychologists, and they have important implications for politics, law, and religion. Yet despite nearly constant attention and debate, very little empirical work was done on these questions until recently. For a long time, the idea that language might shape thought was considered at best untestable and more often simply wrong. Research in my labs at Stanford University and at MIT has helped reopen this question. We have collected data around the world: from China, Greece, Chile, Indonesia, Russia, and Aboriginal Australia. What we have learned is that people who speak different languages do indeed think differently and that even flukes of grammar can profoundly affect how we see the world. Language is a uniquely human gift, central to our experience of being human. Appreciating its role in constructing our mental lives brings us one step closer to understanding the very nature of humanity.


I often start my undergraduate lectures by asking students the following question: which cognitive faculty would you most hate to lose? Most of them pick the sense of sight; a few pick hearing. Once in a while, a wisecracking student might pick her sense of humor or her fashion sense. Almost never do any of them spontaneously say that the faculty they'd most hate to lose is language. Yet if you lose (or are born without) your sight or hearing, you can still have a wonderfully rich social existence. You can have friends, you can get an education, you can hold a job, you can start a family. But what would your life be like if you had never learned a language? Could you still have friends, get an education, hold a job, start a family? Language is so fundamental to our experience, so deeply a part of being human, that it's hard to imagine life without it. But are languages merely tools for expressing our thoughts, or do they actually shape our thoughts?


Read the rest on Edge.org.

 

Tags: cognition, evolution, language, mind, thinking

Views: 776

Replies to This Discussion

Yes, that documentary touches on Victor. I've visited that wiki page before, but I don't think I've ever taken the time to read all of it. However, all this reminded me of the movie about him, so I've requested it from the library. (Wild Child, by Truffaut)
Oops. I didn't see that you included a video clip (I've been reading and replying to the emails, ignoring the forum post). Yeah, funny that the movie came out nearly at the same time that Genie was rescued.

This study makes the point that how you describe behaviors of a group member strongly predisposes toward stereotyping or not.

Hearing generic language to describe a category of people, such as "boys have short hair," can lead children to endorse a range of other stereotypes about the category, a study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University has found.

The study focused on "social essentialism," or the belief that certain social categories, such as race or gender, mark fundamentally distinct kinds of people. For instance, social essentialism facilitates the belief that because one girl is bad at math, girls in general will be bad at math.

Generic Language Helps Fuel Stereotypes

I've lost the reference, (it was in a Media Ecology discussion of the effects of print) but I'd read that Midaeval stories routinely described people with such categorizations instead of treating them as individuals, such as "The village idiot"  or "The wayward son". If this is true, it would indicate a serious shift in thought process through language use. If the habitual use of print media gave us the capacity to escape essentialism, to what extent will the replacement of widespread book reading with internet use predispose toward a resurgence of stereotyping?

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