Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain said Sunday that communities have a right to ban Islamic mosques.

Appearing on "Fox News Sunday," the former Godfather's Pizza CEO said protests and legal challenges to a planned mosque in Tennessee city are an example of local residents pushing back.

Cain said his view doesn't amount to religious discrimination because he says Muslims are trying to inject Shariah law into the U.S.

http://news.yahoo.com/herman-cain-communities-ban-mosques-231949077...

 

This is bad.  I hope the other candidates don't pick up this mantra.  I'm not nuts about Islam, but Muslims have just as much right to practice their religion as anyone else.  I think Herman Cain and his ilk are just sorry they haven't been able to get the christian laws forced on the rest of us. 

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I love it!  He makes a great point.  You don't see this with Christian groups the same way as with Muslim groups right now.  Far many more Christian groups will denounce Christian Law interfering with the law of the land, as compared to how many Muslims groups aren't willing to speak out against interference by Muslim Law.  He hit the nail on the head with these comments.  The spotlight does need to be shone here for awhile (probably a long while).  We need more Muslims to speak out against Sharia Law; that's not happening even remotely as much as it needs to happen.  The ongoing relentless attempts to spread Sharia Law by Muslims (and the inability, unwillingness, and fear of other Muslims to do anything about it) is something Americans need to face up to and deal with. 

Give up moral relativism, it's immoral.  So many atheists are liberal and so many liberals are moral relativists (at least when it suits their arguments).  Ethical relativism and moral relativism are gravely flawed.  See The Story of Omelas for an example of how and why.
great point :)

Having recently watched a documentary on Islam, I agree it was a religion born in violence.  Perhaps it was not violent at one time, but many adherents are certainly violent now.  I don't know if Muslims who disagree with the extreme branches are afraid to speak up for fear of being killed or being called "not Muslim enough" which I understand can also get a person killed.  Obviously, it is not a faith that allows for much disagreement.  I think it is destined to fracture like all the other major religions with one group pitted against another.

 

However...

Just because Muslims can be violent doesn't mean people of other faiths can't also be violent.  It appears this latest sad event in Norway was not the result of Islamic action, but most likely a deeply disturbed Christian.  I am not a big reader of news from India, but every once in awhile, I   read how girls are often starved or murdered in that country for faith motivated reasons.  It appears to me, that some Hindus also believe it is okay to mistreat and murder girls.  There is also the whole cast system thing which is just awful.  I don't think I need to go into that one.  I think everyone is pretty well aware of how bad that is. 

 

Muslims don't have a monopoly on the bad behavior market.
I agree Grace - I believe all religions to be inherently violent - but none more vile and violent as is the case with Islam. Inherently, I believe that a true devout believer who is devout to the principles of the quran and the hadith would embrace or give justifications for violence. I can not say the same thing for Christianity.

Just to pipe in where others have discussed, this is about how I feel about it too.

 

That's not to say that I stereotype all muslims as violent - far from it.  I might, but I did live for 18 months in a muslim country (Turkey) and didn't see any difference between people there and people here in the US.  Just normal ordinary people. That was in the late 70s.  Then look to countries like the former Yugoslavia, where Christians massacred each other and Muslims, and Rwanda, were Christians massacred other Christians, and other parts of Africa (Uganda and Ghana) that seem to be competing with each other as who can be the first to start killing large #s of homosexuals, with the apparent inspiration by American evangelicals, and I understand where people are coming from stating that Christianity is violent.  Or at least Christians are violent.

 

While we are at it, we could add the Shinto-inspired patriotic Japanese who slaughtered millions(?) of unarmed Chinese during WWII.  And countless other religions.

 

I think it's not "which of these is good and which is bad" but rather "which of theses bad and which is badder" It's like which do I prefer, pancreatic cancer or melanoma?

You did live in Turkey - which is the least violent Islamic country (that in itself says a lot esp. with the Turkish massacres/genocides) but unfortunately the people in Turkey are now starting to revert to Islam and the nationalistic fervor of the great Ataturk is starting to dissipate in favor of Islam...but even then, Turkey is an exception to the rest of the Islamic world with some in Turkey torn on wanting to be a part of the E.U. and others wanting to revert back to Islam...but you are right, people of all religions can resort to violence and terror. Where I think we differ is that based on my experience and knowledge of Islam - when Islam is practiced devoutly, it leads to violence (as was not the case when you were in Turkey). As was also not the case with Iran under the Shah.

But you make great points based on personal experience.

<i>I believe that a true devout believer who is devout to the principles of the quran and the hadith would embrace or give justifications for violence. I can not say the same thing for Christianity.</i>

 

Then you're not paying attention.

Herman Cain knows what he's talking about.  Watch this short interview on Creating Jobs.
http://www.dickmorris.com/blog/herman-cain-interview-on-creating-jo...

Perhaps the most absurd irony at work in our partisan politics today is the theocratic right's claim that the Founding Fathers were all Christians who would not have wanted Islam practiced anywhere in the U.S. when, in fact, one of our earliest treaties, with a North African country, expressly stated that we were not Christians, that we welcomed all faiths equally and without rank or superiority.  Indeed, this is what the First Amendment guarantees.  What Cain wants is to outlaw Islam entirely and set up his Jebus as head of government.  As Huckabee put it, interpret the Constitution and all law by Christian principles.  Uh, a few of us might have a problem with that.
You're damn right a few of us might have a problem with that. Everyone that believes in the constitution, no matter what your faith is, should have a problem with that.
Jefferson wrote the religious freedom statute for Virginia, and his comment on its passing was that now even Hindus and Muslims could worship in their own way in Virginia.  This law, passed before the Constitution was written, pre-dates even the Treaty of Tripoli, and it was the model for the establishment clause.

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