I'm sitting here in art history class and we're discussing religious influence on art. They're focusing on early Christianity, and I don't know if its a bad thing, but with each question I just want to make some cynical or maybe even spiteful answer.

Our teacher is very good at not being an ideologue, but the questions annoy me.

Teacher: "And what was the purpose of the water baptism ritual for Christians?"
My thought: "Because those cheap asses wanted an excuse for a free bath."
Students: Giving pertinent answers.

Happy Monday!

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lol. hang in there man. ya just gotta laugh it off. i understand exactly what you're going through but whenever something really get's to me I just have to take a step back and laugh at the little jokes in life. As cruel of a joke as religion is, it's still a joke, and their beliefs are quite laughable.
Have you ever seen the mosaic of Jesus that is composed entirely of pictures of naked women? It's a larger version of this picture (on the larger version, you can zoom in and see the individual women):

WTF??? That's quite ironic. It's kinda like the "bibles for porn" thing.
Well at least you're getting a good idea as to what the mentality was during the Dark Ages.
I think that's the biggest part of this whole thing. I'm getting a better perception of the people of these days, even in my U.S. history class I'm sitting there astonished at what some of the people did pertaining to religion.

Keeps class funny though.
When I think of religious art, I think of Pacher’s Wolfgang und der Teufel (”Saint Wolfgang and the Devil”). I really wish I'd taken a picture of it when I was there, but I did finally find it online.

WTF?
....Does he have a face on his ass?
My thoughts as well. Now imagine that it is eating.
Ever tried not to laugh in an art museum? This was my favorite in the religious art wing. :) Pacher must have been a pretty odd guy.
The Origin of Baptism from Infidels.org

"BAPTISM BY WATER
"Baptism by water," says Mr. Higgins, "is a very old rite, being practiced by the followers of Zoroaster, by the Romans, the Egyptians, and other nations." It was also in vogue among the ancient Hindoos at a still earlier date. Their mode of administering it was to dip the candidate for immersion three times in the watery element, in the same manner as is now practiced by some of the Christian sects, during the performance of which the hierophant would ejaculate the following prayer and ceremony: "O Lord, this man is impure, like the mud of this stream! But do thou cleanse and deliver his soul from sin as the water cleanses his body." They believed that water possessed the virtue of purifying both soul and body -- the latter from filth and the former from sin. The ancient Mexicans, Persians, Hindoos and Jews were in the habit of baptizing their infants soon after they were born. And the water used for this purpose was called "the water of regeneration." Paul speaks of being "saved by the washing of regeneration. (See Titus iii. 5.) Those who touched these infants before they were baptize were deemed impure. And as this was unavoidable on the part of the mothers, they were required, as in the cases of the mothers of Chrishna and Christ, to present themselves on the eighth day after accouchement to the priest in the temple to be purified. The Romans chose the eighth day for girls and the ninth for boys. The child was usually named (christened) at the time it was baptized. And in India, the name, or God's name, or some other mark, was engraven or written on the forehead. This custom is several times recognized in the Christian bible, both in the old and in the New Testament. (See Ezek. ix 4; Rev. xiv. 9; xix. 20, etc.) John speaks of a mark being made on the forehead. (See Rev. xiii. 16.) Also of the name of God being written on the forehead. (Rev. iii. 12.)"

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