I have noticed atheists coming out in support of homosexuals. Do some feel that supporting homosexuality is a necessary part of atheism ? Or, do they support homosexuality simply because religion opposes it? What is the attitude of atheists in general to homosexuality? Where homosexuality deserves support and where it should not be supported?

MADHUKAR KULKARNI

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What kind of support do you need form anyone but your other half to have a successful marriage. Other than legal support of course. I see no problem in serial monogamy, But I still think it is indicative of a lack of constitution, A flippant life is fine and its anyones choice but I think they are missing out on structure that could help them become more stable ( If stability is important for them personally.). However I say non of this as judgement, I just think marriage is a good tool......Its just a shame about some of the TOOLS using it!!

well I just notice that a lot of single friends will advice a person to leave their partner when times are tough - instead of encouraging them to work it out and providing hints and tips on how to get through difficult times in the relationship.

I think divorce just indicates the poor choice made in getting married in most cases, I see a lot of people getting married very quickly after meeting, sometimes only a year or so. I think you need to live with a partner for years to know enough about your compatibility or lack of it. A lack of maturity at all ages by the majority of people is the main problem. 

  On a side note " GO PENNY WONG !!!!" I loved her speech in sydney the other day.

Conservative Christianity, Islam, and Judaism have so strongly reined in sexual expression that the entire culture is permeated with harsh judgment toward sexual variations.

Not only do homosexuals suffer from such disapproval, but also anyone who watches pornography, who masturbates, who falls outside gender norms, who explores role-play during sex, who cannot remain monogamous, etc., etc., etc.

Among the religious, the only universally acceptable form of sexual expression is a married, heterosexual couple in bed in the missionary position, and such restrictions would condemn a large portion of society, including gay men and lesbians, to lives of celibacy and self-denial. In other words, the churches have tried to be in charge of stopping sex, and in many ways forbidding expressions of love.

Atheists who have left these religions behind have had to grapple with creating self-acceptance in a world where rejection of our non-faith is common. Those who have decided to "come out" as atheists have noticed a shared experience with gay self-acceptance. We gay folks have been grappling with rejection for years ... decades ... generations.

Nothing can bond a people together so much as a shared experience. Atheists and GLBT folks have a common relationship with society at large, so we share a common goal. I have been exceedingly grateful for the voices from the atheist community raised in support for equal rights for members of the GLBT community, including equal marriage rights and non-discrimination laws.

And I have been equally disappointed in parts of my GLBT community who have too often sided with the religious elements of society, in spite of all the harsh judgments they have inflicted on us.

So, Madhukar, I encourage you to broaden your perspective. Human sexuality comprises a beautiful kaleidoscope of fulfilling expressions and creative connections. MOST of them will not be your cup of tea. But so long as there is no deceit, harm, and the activities occur among consenting adults, I urge you not to begin from a place of expected disapproval when you are not on your own identify with a given sexual attraction or practice. Instead examine why you might feel so negative about a people who love one another differently from the way you yourself practice. Unless there is evidence for deceit or harm, then chances are your judgments echo from a religious culture and potentially your own religious background.

Thanks for your thoughtful reply. Much better than I could have articulated.

Very well said!

I think there is a strong correlation between atheism and belief in equality.  That said, one could have a personal bias against homosexuality, or mount an argument based on natural selection.

nah...  sure individuals may feel personal revulsion at the thought of homosexuality....  but you might feel the same about eating a particular food..... just because you don't like the idea of eating raw cauliflower, doesn't mean you should stop someone else doing it.

In terms of natural selection - how could you mount an argument based on that for being against people following their natural instinct?

The evolutionary argument would be that homosexuals are not likely to pass on their genes.

One's revulsion could be so strong that one's belief should be that it's unnatural and no one should do it.   These are not my views, just making the argument.

I don't care for broccoli and really have a problem with broccoli apologists. ;->

This is not strictly true, take a gay brother to a sister that procreates. If he is a good uncle and protective of his sister he could perhaps allow a child to be raised to the age of procreation in an environment where it may not have been successful without the assistance. So it is quite complex and the fact that homosexuality even exists is evidence that some for of beneficial selection has occurred. 

Sure, homosexuals may be less likely to pass on their genes - but how does that make an argument against them being homosexual?  Isn't that just a bi product of their nature, rather than a reason to go against their nature?

Also - I've met quite a few women in gay relationships with children, and also I've met 2 sets of gay couples who have decided to have children together - meaning that they did pass on their genes and the children got 4 parents instead of 2.

Sure, homosexuals may be less likely to pass on their genes - but how does that make an argument against them being homosexual?

It doesn't - it's an argument for being opposed to homosexuality as being abnormal, therefore being opposed to it.

Also - I've met quite a few women in gay relationships with children ...

 I didn't say they wouldn't or couldn't, just less likely.

 

I'm not invested in these arguments, just answering the OP's question.

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