So we all know that Atheists are considered the least patriotic clique/group in American right? I have a simple question that might just take a little thought: What do you think is the least patriotic clique, group, or general assortment of people in America? If you are from the UK or another place you can also have a say in this or post the least in your area.

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Yessss, I have two votes already. I might beat McCain's ballot history! *pumps fist in the air*

But you lot had better be careful...I assume you haven't read my "If I Were World Dictator" thread. Muahaha.

Nerd: maaaan, how'd you survive accounting?! It's awesome you're going for the business degree...I chickened out. *Le sigh.*
Had to look at the question again to see what this topic was about. When did it go from being patriotic to bashing the USA?

American hatred runs deep. You wouldn't think so on this site. I've never studied the hatred, but I'm a proud American. I love it here. I've been to other countries. Met some wonderful people. I always had respect for the country I was in. I never questioned someone's loyalty to their country. Never wanted to live anywhere else but in the USA. Always glad to come home to my country. Actually felt safer here than most places. Can't remember if I've ever worn a flag pin, although, I was in the military. I probably have. I did wear an MIA bracelet once. Does that count? I don't have a bumper sticker, but I've laughed at a few. Sometimes I place my hand over my heart when they play the National Anthem. If that means I'm a Patriotic American, than I am. Maybe I do those things out of respect for my country. God-fearing, no. Christian-fearing, yes. I hope that doesn't warrant my suspension from this site.
I hope that doesn't warrant my suspension from this site

Whoa. Where'd you get the idea from?
Only if sincerity and sensability warrents suspension and all evidence points to no. ;)
I think the current patriotism climate in America is similar to here in the Uk . We suffer from a stigma from colonial and past history when Great Britain went roughshod round the world, forcing their might and will on usually non willing hosts. We have spent most of the last few years it seems apologising for our past actions. Things definitely became more patriotic after WW2 but now it seems our involvement in Iraq / Afghanistan etc has made it cool for the rest of the world to hate us and the USA again. Recent comments by ex PM Tony Blair on how he believes he would have invaded Iraq anyway despite there being no WMD's, seem to be fuelled by his sudden freshly awoken christian beliefs! I think our past and current government's actions have made people embarrassed to be patriotic in public, yet privately I think The Americans and us Brits are fiercely proud! I think atheism is another word for "common sense" , and most religions tend to jump on whatever bandwagon is rolling at the time to justify their own beliefs or criticise others.
The American flag = Idol worship. Blasphemy!!! Wear it proudly!
Heard today;

"Patriotism;the virtue of the vicious' (Attributed to Manfred Von Richtofen,although I have my doubts)

From wiki

"Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (2 May 1892 – 21 April 1918) was a German fighter pilot known as the "Red Baron". He was the most successful flying ace during World War I, being officially credited with 80 confirmed air combat victories.[1][2] He served in the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte). Richthofen was a member of an aristocratic family with many famous relatives."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manfred_von_Richthofen
Hey, I wear a Canadian flag when I travel out of the country for the same reason!
We do not have any unpatriotic people in America -- oh, possibly Rev. Wright. As soon as they come out as an unpatriot, they are unceremoniously booted out. Take the case of the film comedian, Charles Chaplin. He was super popular until scandals about his satyriasis (he not only had a huge sexual appetite, he liked younger and younger women) took him down as #1 box office. (My opinion: silents like The Good Rush and sound films like The Great Dictator mark the man as one of the greatest creative talents Hollywood has ever seen, matched only, perhaps, by Buster Keaton.) Yet, it was not the sexual rumor and innuendo that brought him down; it was his anti-war sentiments and his links to international communist groups.

In 1947, when the communist scare was on the rise, Chaplin wrote, directed, and starred in a brilliant black comedy based on the legend of the French tale of Bluebeard -- not the medieval Gilles de Retz but a more recent villain, Henri Landru -- who serially marries and murders rich women. This goes on until he meets the unwilling Martha Raye; he is caught and put to trial. When he takes the stand in his own defense, he asks the court, why did it regard his crimes as so horrific when, as everyone knows, the state slaughters many thousands more in the trenches.

Charlie was a true unpatriot. Although baptized in the Anglican Church of England, one magazine writer concluded from a review of the biographical evidence that Chaplin was a lifetime agnostic. But now that you mention it, I know of at least one other American who became in her time the biggest unpatriot in Amerika: the late Madalyn Murray O'Hair. I knew the woman personally and can attest that her pet peeve was the notion that because one is an atheist this of necessity means one is also unpatriotic. Pointing to her extensive military career, O'Hair asked me, "If I am so unpatriotic, why did I give of myself in defense of my country?"

O'Hair was so unpopular that when some ex-cons she hired to work around the American Atheists' office in Austin kidnapped her, murdered her, and made off with her assets, the talk was only of selling out: O'Hair stole the A.A. fortune, she's living somewhere in South America, she's bought a lifetime residency in Putoguay. All nonsense, but probably still believed by the masses. I myself guessed as much. Shame on me! It always helps in the condemnation of an unpatriotic person if they have political, sexual or religious beliefs different from your own.
I agree, The Gold Rush and The Great Dictator are brilliant.

It always helps in the condemnation of an unpatriotic person if they have political, sexual or religious beliefs different from your own.

Indeed.

I remember when I was a child in the 60s, my devout Catholic grandfather railing against some woman named Madalyn Murray O'Hair. It's good to get a fuller picture of who she was, rather than just a she-Anti-Christ
I dunno, all the atheists I know love America. I think it's easy to go from legitimate crticism to just blaming America. It is. fantastic country. I don't think you have to love it or hate it.
In my mind patriotism is about doing your part to make your community a nice place to live. In my case that means voting and generally not being a dick. It has nothing to do with wearing pins, pledging allegiance, or adhering to whatever ideology the media or current regime demands. None of that is really about patriotism, it's about status. It's about convincing the neighbors that you conform to whatever standards are needed to compete with fake people for fake status.

I do, however, think that with communication the way it is the world is shrinking. This means that ignoring the well being of others, outside of the imaginary lines we call borders, is no longer practical. This doesn't excuse the way in which my government has chosen to bully other nations, if anything it's a case for greater diplomacy.

I'll admit that I tend to get a little offended by some of the anti-Americanism I come across. I have no problem with criticisms about the way things are run, or suggestions on how to improve things. The issue I have is when it comes down to stereotyping and ignorant statements about the character of our citizens.

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